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        Denitia - “Forever”
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︎ ART
        No Dignity
        Resembles Heaven
        Plenty For Us To Kill
        Lift Yrself
        A Bad Toothache
        Sold in Miami for Big Bucks
        Sounds of the Days Ahead
        Error Breeds Sense
        Everything Melts
        Hoard Antibiotics
        Stockpile Lentils
        Boom Gone Bust
        Settle for Lasting Infamy
        Whatever Happened?
        Kind of Cult Mysticism
        Mejor Ser Rich Que Poor
        Pleasures Accumulate
        All is ill
        Call It an Empire
        How Mercurial Is Life
        No Guts, No Glory

        Sink or Swim #1
        Sink or Swim #2
        Memories Beget Memories


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4. Loren Eiseley





LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




Yet whenever I see a frog’s eye low in the water warily ogling the shoreward landscape, I always think inconsequentially of those twiddling mechanical eyes that mankind manipulates nightly from a thousand observatories. Someday, with a telescopic lens an acre in extent, we are going to see something not to out liking, some looming shape outside there across the great pond of space.
            Whenever I catch a frog’s eye I am aware of this, but I do not find it depressing. I stand quite still and try hard not to move or lift a hand since it would only frighten him. And standing thus it finally comes to me that this is the most enormous extension of vision of which life is capable: the projection of itself into other lives. This is the lonely magnificent power of humanity. It is, far more than any spatial adventure, the supreme epitome of the reaching out.
Mark